5-3-1: Cycle 2, Week 3 Summary

I started Jim Wendler’s 5-3-1 lifting program 7 weeks ago. 5-3-1 follows a 4-week lifting cycle; this was the third week of my second cycle. Week 3 involves 3 sets for each major lift; a first set of 5 reps, second set of 3 reps and final set of 1 rep (5-3-1). The 3rd set is the “all-out” set so you are supposed to do 1+ reps, completing as many reps as you can do with proper form.

Here’s a summary of my lifts for Week 3:

Military Press:
5 x 55 lbs
3 x 60 lbs
4 x 65 lbs

Deadlift:
5 x 120 lbs
3 x 135 lbs
8 x 150 lbs

Bench Press:
5 x 60 lbs
3 x 70 lbs
6 x 80 lbs

Squat:
5 x 105 lbs
3 x 115 lbs
1 x 130 lbs


Notes:
-I had previously been doing 4 lifting days per week, with each major lift on a separate day. This week I started doing additional conditioning workout days, so I switched to a 2 day per week 5-3-1 schedule. One day of Deadlifts followed by Military press, and the second day of Squats followed by Bench Press.

-My deadlifts were decent, and my military press was okay but not great. I think the strength gains are going to be a bit slower with the 2 days per week lifting routine, especially because burpee/sprint conditioning workouts are tiring my body out a lot since I haven’t done them in a while.

-My bench was decent as well, but my squats felt terrible. I think I’m stalling on the squats so I’m going to lower the weights on the next cycle. It sucks to have to take a step back, but ultimately my strength will go up if I try to progress more slowly rather than trying to push for weights I can’t handle.

Starting my deload week tomorrow, and then time for Cycle 3 next week!

5-3-1: Cycle 2, Week 1 Summary

I started Jim Wendler’s 5-3-1 lifting program 5 weeks ago. 5-3-1 follows a 4-week lifting cycle; this was the first week of my second cycle. Week 1 involves 3 sets of 5 reps for each major lift. The 3rd set is the “all-out” set so you are supposed to do 5+ reps, completing as many reps as you can do with proper form.

Here’s a summary of my lifts for Week 1:

Military Press:
5 x 45 lbs
5 x 55 lbs
5 x 60 lbs

Deadlift:
5 x 105 lbs
5 x 120 lbs
16 x 135 lbs

Bench Press:
5 x 55 lbs
5 x 60 lbs
14 x 70 lbs

Squat:
5 x 90 lbs
5 x 105 lbs
10 x 115 lbs


Notes:
-I was really happy with my deadlifts, my squats, and my bench press this week. I set new PR’s for all 3 of those lifts, and I finally got into the double-digit rep range for squats (last cycle I only managed 8 reps of 115 lbs and 8 reps of 120 lbs).

-My military press day was terrible. I felt ridiculously weak…I tried for a 6th rep of 60 lbs and my arms failed on the way up. My military press has been my weakest lift, but I knew that before I started the program. I’m just going to keep progressing slowly, because as long as I’m hitting the required reps, I can still make progress. It didn’t help that I was hungover on that day…my first time drinking in the past 2-3 months. Definitely going to make sure that I am well-rested and energized for my next military press day.

Starting Week 2 on Saturday, tomorrow and Friday will be light workout/rest days to recover before the next week of lifting :)

Waist Measurements :)

My progress in inches since I started lifting consistently:

Jan 3: 29.5 inches
Feb 28: 28.75 inches
June 11: 27.75 inches

Overall:
Lost 1.75 inches on my waist in 5 months

Important notes:
I DID NOT DIET…I tried to choose healthier options, but I never counted calories or nutrients or any of that stuff…I didn’t obsess over what I was eating. Plus I still ate the occasional sweets and fast food, except for about 1 month where I was on a “clean eating challenge.”

I LIFTED REGULARLY…lifting heavy weights is really what started all of the changes in my body. Your body won’t change unless you subject it to a difficult enough resistance…workouts with “barbie weights” won’t do anything.

MY WEIGHT HAS NOT CHANGED AT ALLI have weighed 155 lbs. for the past year. My weight has fluctuated 2-3 lbs at most, but overall I am consistently 155 lbs, and I don’t really care about it, because clearly my body has changed.

OVERALL:
-LIFT HEAVY
-EAT (mostly) CLEAN
-DO HIIT
-USE MEASUREMENTS RATHER THAN SCALE WEIGHT as an indicator of progress.

(PS I really need to get my bodyfat% measured…it was 31% in January and I’m sure it’s lower now)





my progress over 1 year: I’m 5’9” and I weigh 155 lbs in both pictures. there are noticeable changes, even though I have only been super consistent with my workouts for the past 6 months, and my eating habits still need work.
there are so many areas where I have room for improvement: with my diet, my conditioning/HIIT consistency, and my training program design, to name a few.pushing for even greater improvements over the course of this year!

my progress over 1 year: I’m 5’9” and I weigh 155 lbs in both pictures.

there are noticeable changes, even though I have only been super consistent with my workouts for the past 6 months, and my eating habits still need work.

there are so many areas where I have room for improvement: with my diet, my conditioning/HIIT consistency, and my training program design, to name a few.

pushing for even greater improvements over the course of this year!

The 80/20 Rule For FITNESS

I’m sure you’ve heard of the “80/20 Rule” of life. If not, then here’s a quick summary: It seems that 20% of what you do is responsible for 80% of your results, and vice-versa. Another application of the rule is that in most situations you’ll get about 80% of what you want. People are always chasing that extra 20% and as a result often give up their 80% and end up far worse off.

This can, and is, applied to business, sports, relationships, life, fitness, and most everything else. Is it a hard and fast rule? Of course not, but the idea is worth looking into.

I see it all of the time in the gym. Guys are always chasing that magical supplement that will suddenly turn the corner in their physique chase. Girls are always hunting that one “secret” ab exercise that will flatten their tummy and get rid of “these” (*pinching their love-handles).

Guess what? They’re chasing the 20%. They’re also spending so much time focusing on that 20% that they’re not doing the things that will get them their 80. Focus on the basics that you know work for you: Train hard, train heavy, and train the body as a whole. Eat good, basic food that supports your progress. Learn to relax, destress your life, and focus on your productivity. The extra stuff is just that, extra. If you’ve got the time and ability, play around with the 80% of stuff that will bring you the extra 20% of your results, but put your effort into the solid, basic stuff that will maximize your results.